Invest 98-L has become Tropical Depression 9, and is likely to impact Florida

The WDSU weather team is closely watching several areas in the tropics. The main area of interest for us is Tropical Depression Nine.Tropical Depression Nine is over 500 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. This system will likely become a named tropical storm later tonight or tomorrow and a Category 1 hurricane by Sunday. It will likely cross over Cuba and enter the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday.Tropical Depression Nine is in the Caribbean and will move west-northwest across the warm waters of the Caribbean with diminishing wind shear over the next few days. On the current track, Tropical Depression Nine will move across the central Caribbean Sea through Saturday, pass south of Jamaica on Saturday night and Sunday and approach the Cayman Islands on Sunday night and early Monday.Looking at the so-called “spaghetti plots,” the models are mostly grouped over western Cuba. The global models do a better job of forecasting when there is a well-defined eye or center of circulation. The preferred models are the GFS and the European models. The GFS model has shifted its track east, moving the Tropical Depression Nine over western Cuba. It shows Tropical Depression Nine becoming a hurricane and heading toward the Florida Gulf Coast on Wednesday. The European Model is slightly different. It takes Tropical Depression Nine over western Cuba late Monday and then toward the Florida Keys on Tuesday and into the Atlantic. So what are the steering currents? The general setup is a Bermuda high in the Western Atlantic and an upper-level trough over the Northern U.S. and Southern Canada. The timing and placement of how far south and east the trough ‘digs’ and how far west the Bermuda high moves will determine where the eventual storm will move between a farther west solution into the Central Gulf, or a farther east track towards Florida. At this point, keep on checking in on the latest data and discussion here at wdsu.com and on our regular newscast throughout the day. Besides that system, we’re watching major Hurricane Fiona, Tropical Storm Gaston in the north-central Atlantic, Tropical Depression 10 between the Cabo Verde Islands and the West Coast of Africa and another tropical wave west of the Cabo Verde Islands with a low chance of development over the next five days. For much more information on Fiona, click here. Stay with WDSU for the latest.

The WDSU weather team is closely watching several areas in the tropics.

The main area of interest for us is Tropical Depression Nine.

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Tropical Depression Nine is over 500 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica.

This system will likely become a named tropical storm later tonight or tomorrow and a Category 1 hurricane by Sunday. It will likely cross over Cuba and enter the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday.

Tropical Depression Nine is in the Caribbean and will move west-northwest across the warm waters of the Caribbean with diminishing wind shear over the next few days. On the current track, Tropical Depression Nine will move across the central Caribbean Sea through Saturday, pass south of Jamaica on Saturday night and Sunday and approach the Cayman Islands on Sunday night and early Monday.

Looking at the so-called “spaghetti plots,” the models are mostly grouped over western Cuba. The global models do a better job of forecasting when there is a well-defined eye or center of circulation. The preferred models are the GFS and the European models.

The GFS model has shifted its track east, moving the Tropical Depression Nine over western Cuba. It shows Tropical Depression Nine becoming a hurricane and heading toward the Florida Gulf Coast on Wednesday.

The European Model is slightly different. It takes Tropical Depression Nine over western Cuba late Monday and then toward the Florida Keys on Tuesday and into the Atlantic.

So what are the steering currents? The general setup is a Bermuda high in the Western Atlantic and an upper-level trough over the Northern U.S. and Southern Canada. The timing and placement of how far south and east the trough ‘digs’ and how far west the Bermuda high moves will determine where the eventual storm will move between a farther west solution into the Central Gulf, or a farther east track towards Florida.

At this point, keep on checking in on the latest data and discussion here at wdsu.com and on our regular newscast throughout the day.

Besides that system, we’re watching major Hurricane Fiona, Tropical Storm Gaston in the north-central Atlantic, Tropical Depression 10 between the Cabo Verde Islands and the West Coast of Africa and another tropical wave west of the Cabo Verde Islands with a low chance of development over the next five days.

For much more information on Fiona, click here.

Stay with WDSU for the latest.

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